Guest Blog

PURPLE HEART DESIGNATIONS: Cities, Counties, Towns, Universities...& More!

The Department of Texas has an amazing program for Texas schools, universities, businesses, towns, cities, and counties.  If you would like to recognize the sacrifices made by our combat wounded soldiers in Texas. 

As of November 15, 2018 we have a total of 203 Purple Heart Designation of Cities, Counties, Schools, Business's, Etc. in Texas. Below is a breakdown of each category.

  • State of Texas

  • 56 Counties of 254

  • 62 Cities/Towns/Villages

  • 31 Business's/Supporters

  • 22 Universities/Colleges/Schools

  • 19 VFW Posts

  • 4 Highways

  • 2 American Legion Posts  

  • 1 Sports Team ( Texas Rangers)

  • 1 Congressional District

  • 1 River (Comal River)

  • 1 Bridge

  • 1 Ranch (Thumbtack Ranch)

  • 1 Bowl Game ( Lockheed Martin Armed Forces Bowl Game)

Also we have the following as the first in the Nation.

  • Ranch -Thumbtack Ranch

  • Bank - Lytle State Bank

  • Bowl Game - Lockheed Martin Armed Forces Bowl

  • ROTC - W.T. White High School

  • VFW Department - Texas

  • VFW Post - Post 4815 of San Antonio, Texas

  • American Legion Post - Post 597 of Carrollton, Texas

Jon Lunkwicz 

State Commander 

Department of Texas

Military Order of the Purple Heart                                           

Mailing Address: PO BOX 816296 Dallas TX 75381

Email: mophdept.tx@gmail.com

Tel: (972) 754-2230 | Web: http://www.mophtx.com 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mophtexas/ 

World War II - Operation Magic Carpet

There is little sweeter in this world than returning home from combat operations and being restored to family and native soil. THANKFUL - - THANKFUL TO BE GOING HOME … Returning the troops home after WWII was a daunting task. The Magic Carpet that flew everyone home.

The U.S. military experienced an unimaginable increase during World War II. In 1939, there were 334,000 servicemen, not counting the Coast Guard.  In 1945, there were over 12 million, including the Coast Guard. At the end of the war, over 8 million of these men and women were scattered overseas in Europe, the Pacific and Asia.

Shipping them out wasn’t a particular problem but getting them home was a massive logistical headache. The problem didn’t come as a surprise, as Army Chief of Staff General George C. Marshall had already  established committees to address the issue in 1943.

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Soldiers returning home on the USS General Harry Taylor in August 1945

 

When Germany fell in May 1945, the U.S. Navy was still busy fighting in the Pacific and couldn’t assist. The job of transporting 3 million men home fell to the Army and the Merchant Marine. 300 Victory and Liberty cargo ships were converted to troop transports for the task. During the war, 148,000 troops crossed the Atlantic west to east each month; the rush home ramped this up to 435,000 a month over 14 months.

 

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Hammocks crammed into available spaces aboard the USS Intrepid

 

In October 1945, with the war in Asia also over, the Navy started chipping in, converting all available vessels to transport duty. On smaller ships like destroyers, capable of carrying perhaps 300 men, soldiers were told to hang their hammocks in whatever nook and cranny they could find. Carriers were particularly useful, as their large open hangar decks could house 3,000 or more troops in relative comfort, with bunks, sometimes in stacks of five welded or bolted in place.

 

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Bunks aboard the Army transport USS Pennant

 

The Navy wasn’t picky, though: cruisers, battleships, hospital ships, even LSTs (Landing Ship, Tank) were packed full of men yearning for home. Two British ocean liners under American control, the RMS Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth, had already served as troop transports before and continued to do so during the operation, each capable of carrying up to 15,000 people at a time, though their normal, peacetime capacity was less than 2,200. Twenty-nine ships were dedicated to transporting war brides: women married to American soldiers during the war.

 

 https://gallery.mailchimp.com/9d09df2d77a7482fa7ea2efc4/images/abe237da-f5a4-4771-9436-8207d0fb2cfa.jpg

Troops performing a lifeboat drill onboard theQueen Mary in December 1944, before Operation Magic Carpet

 

The Japanese surrender in August 1945 came none too soon, but it put an extra burden on Operation Magic CarpetThe war in Asia had been expected to go well into 1946 and the Navy and the War Shipping Administration were hard-pressed to bring home all the soldiers who now had to get home earlier than anticipated. The transports carrying them also had to collect numerous POWs from recently liberated Japanese camps, many  of whom suffered from malnutrition and illness.

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U.S. soldiers recently liberated from Japanese POW camps

 

The time to get home depended a lot on the circumstances. USS Lake Champlain, a brand new Essex-class carrier that arrived too late for the war, could cross the Atlantic and take 3,300 troops home a little under 4 days and 8 hours. Meanwhile, troops going home from Australia or India would sometimes spend months on slower vessels.

 

 https://gallery.mailchimp.com/9d09df2d77a7482fa7ea2efc4/images/df734c31-ebd0-4e11-bd87-3ef41c2a4a09.jpg

 Hangar of theUSS Wasp during the operation

 

There was enormous pressure on the operation to bring home as many men as possible by Christmas 1945. Therefore, a sub-operation, Operation Santa Claus, was dedicated to the purpose. Due to storms at sea and an overabundance of soldiers eligible for return home, however, Santa Claus could only return a fraction in time and still not quite home but at least to American soil.

The nation’s transportation network was overloaded: trains heading west from the East Coast were on average 6 hours behind schedule and trains heading east from the West Coast were twice that late.

 https://gallery.mailchimp.com/9d09df2d77a7482fa7ea2efc4/_compresseds/18931cdb-3230-44b5-b3a3-d48a3855841e.jpg

The crowded flight deck of the USS Saratoga

 

The USS Saratoga transported home a total of 29,204 servicemen during Operation Magic Carpet, more than any other ship. Many freshly discharged men found themselves stuck in separation centers but faced an outpouring of love and friendliness from the locals. Many townsfolk took in freshly arrived troops and invited them to Christmas dinner in their homes. Still others gave their train tickets to soldiers and still others organized quick parties at local train stations for men on layover.

A Los Angeles taxi driver took six soldiers all the way to Chicago; another took another carload of men to Manhattan, the Bronx, Pittsburgh, Long Island, Buffalo and New Hampshire. Neither of the drivers accepted a fare beyond the cost of gas.

 

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Overjoyed troops returning home on the battleship USS Texas

All in all, though, the Christmas deadline proved untenable.  The last 29 troop transports, carrying some 200,000 men from the China-India-Burma theater, arrived to America in April 1946, bringing Operation Magic Carpet to an end, though an additional 127,000 soldiers still took until September to return home and finally lay down the burden of war. 

TexVet thanks Mike Johnson for sending us this amazing history lesson, a reminder of sacrifices made.  You can learn more about the logistical challenges of World War II on historical tours to Western Europe, the Eastern Front and the Pacific.

IAVA's Rapid Response Referral Program's Weekly Impact Report October 5

RRRP Impact Report

Week Ending October 5, 2018
 

In 2012, Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA) saw a need to create a safety net for transitioning veterans to connect them to the extensive, but often fragmented, network of support systems and resources available to them. The Rapid Response Referral Program (RRRP) has connected over 8,900 veterans to more than 10,700 resources. Unfortunately, the needs of today's veterans remain high. 

RRRP client quote of the week:

“[VTM] has been a very competent and knowledgeable ally in my struggle to get back on my feet after being discharged from the military due to multiple brain injuries.”

Trends:
RRRP processed 17 new cases this week and provided 27 new referrals for clients. Financial assistance, suicide and mental health, and housing and homelessness needs were the top areas clients sought support and assistance with. RRRP served four new veterans facing homelessness and also received inquiries for assistance with employment and navigating the VA disability claims process. Clients continue to report a reduction in stress after working with RRRP’s Veteran Transition Managers.

RRRP Blog Highlight: Why Talking About Suicide Prevention Matters

Overall Impact Metrics:

  • Total Cases: 8,943
  • All Referrals: 10,706
  • Total Benefits Received: 2,123
  • RRRP Customer Service Rating*: 4.62
  • RRRP Partner Quality Rating*: 4.15
  • Average Client Stress Level at Intake*: 4.28
  • Average Reduction in Stress Level at Conclusion: -0.66
  • (* On a scale of 1 to 5)

YTD 2018 Impact Metrics:

  • Cases: 481
  • Average Hours Per Case: 4
  • Referrals: 727
  • Female Veterans Served: 56
  • Veteran Family Members Served: 26
  • Clients At-Risk of Homelessness: 52
  • VCL Connections: 25
  • RRRP Customer Service Rating: 4.82
  • Case Origin:
    • Web Intake Form: 150
    • 91RAPID: 66
    • Email: 178
    • Virtual Veterans Hall: 78
    • Direct Mail: 9

RRRP Gender Breakdown:

  • 79% male
  • 21% female

RRRP Client Average Age: 41

Weekly Metrics:

  • New Cases This Week: 17
  • New Referrals This Week: 27
  • Top 5 Referral Areas:
    • Financial Assistance: 18
    • Suicide & Mental Health: 4
    • Housing & Homelessness: 3
    • Employment: 1
    • Disability Claims: 1

Top 3 Programs Referred to this Week:

  • Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) – Financial Coaching
  • VFW Unmet Needs Program
  • Salute, Inc.

Referral Partner Highlight: Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) – Financial Coaching
In 2015 the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) launched a Financial Coaching Initiative tailored for recently-transitioning veterans to provide critical guidance on money management and help facilitate and actualize financial goals. The program has 60 certified financial coaches, 38 dedicated to serving veterans and 22 who serve both the veteran and civilian populations. These coaches provide client-centered, free, confidential services and focus on financial goals and action toward those goals, utilizing the core values of collaboration, motivation, transparency, and trust. All of CFPB’s coaches have extensive training and credentials, provide swift intervention and support and are available through email, telephone calls, and in-person sessions. RRRP has provided nearly 200 referrals to CFPB to date and is our most trusted and frequently utilized financial coaching and budgeting resource.

Total Referrals by Referral Type
referrals by type

Gender Breakdown
gender breakdown

VTM Customer Service
vtm customer service

Average Partner Program Quality Rating
avg partner program quality

Average Stress Level at Intake
avg stress at intake

Average Reduction in Stress Level at Conclusion
avg reduction in stress

Record Count – Open Cases by Location
cases by location

Total Cases (veterans and family members) Opened by Week (Last 4)
cases by week

Cases by Month for last 12 months
cases by month

Number of Referrals to Program Partners in Last 4 Weeks
referrals

Number of referrals in the past week
referrals past week

 
If you or someone you know is looking for resources or support, RRRP’s Veteran Transition Managers are ready to assist. For more information please reference our FAQ page.

 

By: Hannah Sinoway, M.S.Ed.

Chief Services Officer

IAVA

Rapid Response Referral Program Weekly Impact Report September 28

RRRP Impact Report

Week Ending September 28, 2018
 

In 2012, Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America saw a need to create a safety net for transitioning veterans to connect them to the extensive, but often fragmented, network of support systems and resources available to them. The Rapid Response Referral Program has connected over 8,900 veterans to more than 10,600 resources. Unfortunately, the needs of today's veterans remain high. 

RRRP client quote of the week:

“[VTM] is a jewel in a sea of shells! She is awesome! So helpful and caring!”

Trends:
RRRP processed 13 new cases this week and provided 9 new referrals for clients. Financial assistance and employment needs were the top areas clients sought support and assistance with. RRRP also received inquiries for assistance with health care, education benefits and navigating the VA disability claims process. RRRP served four new veterans facing homelessness. RRRP’s overall average customer service rating went up this week and clients continue to report a reduction in stress after working with RRRP’s Veteran Transition Managers.

RRRP Blog Highlight: Why Talking About Suicide Prevention Matters

Overall Impact Metrics:

  • Total Cases: 8,927
  • All Referrals: 10,679
  • Total Benefits Received: 2,120
  • RRRP Customer Service Rating*: 4.62
  • RRRP Partner Quality Rating*: 4.15
  • Average Client Stress Level at Intake*: 4.28
  • Average Reduction in Stress Level at Conclusion: -0.66
  • (* On a scale of 1 to 5)

YTD 2018 Impact Metrics:

  • Cases: 465
  • Average Hours Per Case: 4
  • Referrals: 700
  • Female Veterans Served: 51
  • Veteran Family Members Served: 26
  • Clients At-Risk of Homelessness: 48
  • VCL Connections: 24
  • RRRP Customer Service Rating: 4.82
  • Case Origin:
    • Web Intake Form: 139
    • 91RAPID: 65
    • Email: 174
    • Virtual Veterans Hall: 77
    • Direct Mail: 9

RRRP Gender Breakdown:

  • 79% male
  • 21% female

RRRP Client Average Age: 41

Weekly Metrics:

  • New Cases This Week: 13
  • New Referrals This Week: 9
  • Top 5 Referral Areas:
    • Financial Assistance: 3
    • Employment: 3
    • Disability Claims: 1
    • Health Care: 1
    • Education: 1

Top 3 Programs Referred to this Week:

  • Operation PAVE
  • Operation Mend
  • Veterans Homebuyers Network

Referral Partner Highlight: Stephen Sillers Tunnel to Towers Foundation
The Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation was created to honor firefighter Stephen Siller who sacrificed his life to save others during the terrorist attacks in New York City on September 11, 2001. The foundation hosts an annual 5k run and walk series which retraces Stephen Siller’s last steps from the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel to the Twin Towers on 9/11. This foundation provides support to families of first responders who lost their lives in the line of duty by setting up trust accounts and mortgage payoffs. They also assist our most seriously injured veterans by building mortgage free smart homes. IAVA is a proud participant of the Tunnel to Towers event and our staff often show their support for this wonderful foundation by volunteering and participating in their programming.

Total Referrals by Referral Type
referrals by type

Gender Breakdown
gender breakdown

VTM Customer Service
vtm customer service

Average Partner Program Quality Rating
avg partner program quality

Average Stress Level at Intake
avg stress at intake

Average Reduction in Stress Level at Conclusion
avg reduction in stress

Record Count – Open Cases by Location
cases by location

Total Cases (veterans and family members) Opened by Week (Last 4)
cases by week

Cases by Month for last 12 months
cases by month

Number of Referrals to Program Partners in Last 4 Weeks
referrals

Number of referrals in the past week
referrals past week

 
If you or someone you know is looking for resources or support, RRRP’s Veteran Transition Managers are ready to assist. For more information please reference our FAQ page.

Support For Survivors of Military Sexual Assault

For anyone who has experienced sexual trauma or assault or cares about someone who has experienced sexual trauma or assault, these recent testimonies of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh may have triggered some difficult feelings. If you are having a difficult time, please know that you’re not alone and that we support you.

Military Sexual Assault (MSA) and other forms of assault are unfortunately a reality for some servicemembers, veterans and civilians. In 2014, the RAND National Defense Research Institute conducted an independent assessment of the rates of sexual assault, sexual harassment, and gender discrimination in the U.S. military. Results reveal that the risk of sexual assault and harassment varies across installations and commands and these risk estimates provide insight into which environments servicemembers are most or least likely to be sexually assaulted or harassed. A significant proportion of all sexual assaults occur at relatively few large installations. Based on the study, RAND recommends that risk estimates should be propagated to military leaders to ensure awareness of problems in their commands and specialized training, prevention, and response interventions should take place.

If you are a survivor of MSA or other assault, this is not your fault and you deserve to heal and recover. For some, reaching out for help is difficult and sometimes self-blame can prevent individuals from seeking help. No one deserves to be assaulted or taken advantage of. No matter what. At IAVA we believe that asking for help is a sign of strength. We are a community that represents nearly 425,000 veterans, family members and supporters and we have each other’s backs. IAVA’s remote case management program, the Rapid Response Referral Program (RRRP) works with veterans and family members across the nation, addressing a wide variety of needs including accessing support for Military Sexual Assault and other forms of assault or trauma. At RRRP we understand the detrimental impact this type of trauma can have on a veteran and sometimes on the entire family. We receive reports from veterans and family members on a far too regular basis about assault. Our Veteran Transition Managers (VTMs) are all masters level social service professionals and have the skills, empathy and expertise to provide quality support, advocacy and streamlined linkages to effective and appropriate on-the-ground resources.

There is much work to be done on this serious issue and defending troops against Military Sexual Assault is an important part of IAVA’s policy agenda. We know that survivors may not choose to formally report a sexual assault for fear of retaliation, whether professional or social. Six percent of respondents from IAVA’s most recent member survey are survivors of Military Sexual Assault. Only one in three reported the crime. Of those, 70 percent experienced retaliation. More importantly, nearly half of survivors said they would have been more likely to report the crime if a trained military prosecutor had the authority to move forward with their case, rather than the commander. Congress must improve the military justice system by placing the disposition authority for all serious crimes in the hands of experienced and impartial military prosecutors, instead of the chain of command. IAVA’s policy team is fighting daily in Washington, DC and across the country to ensure that real change occurs to address Military Sexual Assault and has clear recommendations, which can be found here.

There is help and there is hope out there. The stress of staying silent can have significant impacts on a person and the value in seeking help and support can enable those who have survived this type of trauma to get on a pathway toward healing, recovery and happiness. If you or a veteran you know has experienced MSA or any other type of assault or trauma, reach out to us today. We are here. We will listen. We will support you. And we will ensure that you have access to the services that you need and deserve. No matter what.

 

By: Hannah Sinoway, M.S.Ed

Chief Services Officer

IAVA

Why Talking About Suicide Prevention Matters

September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. This is a time to raise awareness, a time to reach out to those who have been affected, a time to educate and connect people to resources, and most importantly, a time to start the conversation in an effort to save lives.

In the United States, suicide is the 10th leading cause of death. Suicide does not discriminate, ripping lives apart without regard to age, gender, race, ethnicity, economic or social status. This public health epidemic is infiltrating our military and veteran communities every single day. These selfless men and women took an oath to protect our country, providing us with the uniquely American rights to freedom of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness are dying by suicide at the alarming rate of 20 servicemembers and veterans each day.

The Department  of Veteran Affairs reports that veterans are twice as likely to die by suicide than civilians. In Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America’s (IAVA) latest Member Survey, 65% of IAVA members know a post-9/11 veteran who attempted suicide, and 58% know a post-9/11 veteran that died by suicide.

For the last 3 years, I have worked for IAVA’s Rapid Response Referral Program (RRRP), guiding and supporting countless veterans and family members struggling to find mental health resources. These individuals are searching for someone to hear them out, at their most vulnerable time, and – even simply to be humanized. When I speak to these clients, my voice may soften a little more than usual, and at times I may share parts of my own struggle, to let them know that yes, I do hear you, I am listening, and I have your back. At these moments, I am reminded of why I chose social work as my career path and why I chose to work at IAVA: to be the person I needed when I was younger.

On March 13th, 2005, my best friend, my person, my Marine, my Thomas, died by suicide.

Thomas always knew he wanted to join the Marine Corps, and in June 2000, a week before our high school graduation, he was off to bootcamp. Thomas was stationed in Okinawa, Japan during the attacks on 9/11, and I remember him assuring me that everything was going to be ok. There was no fear in his voice, just genuine love and honor. Being a Marine gave him a level of confidence and self-worth I had never seen in him before, a feeling of true purpose. The next few years were filled with pre-deployment rituals, care packages with mixed tapes, and weekly letters and cards knowing that most would never arrive to him on time or at all. In June 2004, we drove from Camp Pendleton back home to New York, with anticipation and excitement of the idea that he would finally be home, safe, and we could figure out our future. I would have never believed that 9 months later would be the end of that future.

I can honestly say I didn’t see any of the signs, but that doesn’t mean they weren’t there. I can say that because I didn’t know anything about suicide, only that it was a sin, shameful, something that was condemned by the religion and the culture I grew up in. There was never a conversation or any education about it. Yet, there I was, a 22 year old, weeks away from graduating college, and completely thunderstruck. My mind kept repeating this one sentence over and over: Things like this don’t happen to people like me.

Surviving a loved one’s suicide is the most unimaginable hell. In that one moment, your world is forever changed and nothing makes sense. So what do you do? You grieve. You cry, scream, throw a tantrum (or 50), but you survive. Some days I wonder how I’ve made it through these last 13 years, and I am always brought back to my first step towards finding hope.

For me, that first step was finding a group of people that could relate. I found a local support group for suicide survivors on the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) website, and literally dragged myself (and my sister Marie) to the meeting. As I walked through the door, I immediately noticed there were a lot of people. Too many people. Parents, siblings, friends, men, women, all ages. All of a sudden I didn’t feel so alone, but in the worst of ways. It eventually became my “safe place” and I truly believe it saved my life.

Logo

How did I not know all of these people from my own community were going through something too similar? Because the stigma surrounding mental health and suicide is all too real. Because no one wants to talk about it. Because the misconceptions surrounding suicide are easier to digest than the actual truth. This needs to end now. Dismantling the stigma can only happen when we (yes, you too) step outside our comfort zone and become part of the conversation. Engage in your community, check in on friends, educate yourself.

A lot of people have commented on how “strong” they think I am, how I “inspire” them, how they would never have been able to “get over” all of this like I have. Let’s be honest, I am no stronger than anyone else, and I will never get over Thomas dying by suicide. Healing takes a lot of work. I’ve attended therapy, volunteered in my community, explored new hobbies, and of course devoured research studies and documentaries about suicide and mental health. I literally went to graduate school in hopes of finding the magical cure to all of this, which, spoiler alert, healing takes time, magic is not real, and it certainly does not pay off your student loans.

For me, sharing this journey and connecting with other survivors has filled in the cracks of my once broken heart. It feeds my soul. When things feel off, I ask for help. I allow myself to be vulnerable and tell the people I trust that I’m having a rough time. A rough day. A rough few weeks that I may have been trying to hide from everyone and I just can’t fake it anymore. I am still a work in progress, and that’s ok. This does not mean I am weak. No, No. This is a sign of STRENGTH.

Thomas was the kindest, funniest, most loyal man I have ever known, and I am a better person because of him. I share my story to keep his memory alive, because the way Thomas died is only one second of the 22 ½ years the world was blessed with his presence.  

Fact: Suicide is 100% Preventable.
Ask for help. 
Reach Out. 
Engage with your community. 
Share your story.
Know you are not alone.
Know that you are loved. So, So Loved.
Hope defeats Suicide.

 

Suicide lifeline logo

VeteransCrisisLineLogo

If you or a veteran you know is struggling with mental health challenges, IAVA’s Rapid Response Referral Program is standing by to assist. Reach out to us today.

RRRP Weekly Impact Report September 21

RRRP Impact Report

Week Ending September 21, 2018
 

In 2012, Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America saw a need to create a safety net for transitioning veterans to connect them to the extensive, but often fragmented, network of support systems and resources available to them. The Rapid Response Referral Team has connected over 8,900 veterans to more than 10,600 resources. Unfortunately, the needs of today's veterans remain high. 

RRRP client quote of the week:

“My case manager listened to me and understood what I was going through in a way that no one else ever has.”

Trends:
RRRP processed 19 new cases this week and provided 26 new referrals for clients. Financial assistance, suicide and mental health, and housing needs were the top areas clients sought support and assistance with. RRRP also received inquiries for legal help and assistance navigating the VA disability claims process. RRRP served three new female veterans, three new veteran family members and two new veterans facing homelessness. RRRP’s overall average partner quality rating went up this week and clients continue to report a reduction in stress after working with RRRP’s Veteran Transition Managers.

RRRP Blog Highlight: Why Talking About Suicide Prevention Matters

Overall Impact Metrics:

  • Total Cases: 8,914
  • All Referrals: 10,679
  • Total Benefits Received: 2,120
  • RRRP Customer Service Rating*: 4.61
  • RRRP Partner Quality Rating*: 4.15
  • Average Client Stress Level at Intake*: 4.28
  • Average Reduction in Stress Level at Conclusion: -0.66
  • (* On a scale of 1 to 5)

YTD 2018 Impact Metrics:

  • Cases: 452
  • Average Hours Per Case: 4
  • Referrals: 694
  • Female Veterans Served: 50
  • Veteran Family Members Served: 26
  • Clients At-Risk of Homelessness: 44
  • VCL Connections: 24
  • RRRP Customer Service Rating: 4.81
  • Case Origin:
    • Web Intake Form: 129
    • 91RAPID: 64
    • Email: 174
    • Virtual Veterans Hall: 77
    • Direct Mail: 8

RRRP Gender Breakdown:

  • 79% male
  • 21% female

RRRP Client Average Age: 41

Weekly Metrics:

  • New Cases This Week: 19
  • New Referrals This Week: 26
  • Top 5 Referral Areas:
    • Financial Assistance: 10
    • Suicide & Mental Health: 4
    • Housing: 4
    • Legal: 3
    • Disability Claims: 2

Top 3 Programs Referred to this Week:

  • Give an Hour
  • PenFed Foundation – Military Heroes Fund
  • Salute, Inc.

Referral Partner Highlight: Give an Hour
Give an Hour is a non-profit organization that develops national networks of volunteers that assist those in need and identifies at-risk populations that benefit from receiving services through these volunteer networks. Since 2005, this program has provided free mental health care to active duty, National Guard and Reserve servicemembers, veterans and their families. Give an Hour does this through a network of qualified therapists who have necessary skills and expertise to meet the needs of service members, veterans and their families. These therapists donate their time and ensure easy access to quality mental health support. Give an Hour also recognizes and addresses barriers that prevent those in need from accessing or receiving support and works to improve community coordination and collaboration for populations served. RRRP has worked closely with Give an Hour since 2012 and has referred over 100 veterans and family members to access free, quality mental health support.

Total Referrals by Referral Type
referrals by type

Gender Breakdown
gender breakdown

VTM Customer Service
vtm customer service

Average Partner Program Quality Rating
avg partner program quality

Average Stress Level at Intake
avg stress at intake

Average Reduction in Stress Level at Conclusion
avg reduction in stress

Record Count – Open Cases by Location
cases by location

Total Cases (veterans and family members) Opened by Week (Last 4)
cases by week

Cases by Month for last 12 months
cases by month

Number of Referrals to Program Partners in Last 4 Weeks
referrals

Number of referrals in the past week
referrals past week

 
If you or someone you know is looking for resources or support, RRRP’s Veteran Transition Managers are ready to assist. For more information please reference our FAQ page.

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